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paris shooting

In solidarity.
It's considered one of Paris' oldest nightspots.
Sounds of the explosions outside could be heard inside the Stade de France.
At least 35 people are dead after explosions and shootings rocked Paris Friday. Police say around 100 hostages have been
It is a black and white matter. Killing journalists because they write, draw or publish something you deem offensive is wrong, and yes, it is wrong even if the thing you deemed offensive is, objectively speaking, offensive. There are no shades of grey here, no colours, no nuances. None of that is relevant. It matters not if the cartoons were vulgar or sexist, or, as many think, not funny.
We as a world need to understand and question exactly how a country's barometer for "freedom" is fair when the right of a Muslim woman to wear hijab is not sacrosanct but the publishing of hate cartoons is? Where anti-Semitism is a crime but anti-Muslim is not? I think France needs to examine closely what constitutes "freedom" for them or whether their intensity for secularism both historically and now is even at pace with the existing population of more than five million of their own Muslim residents or their rights.
As the world reels from Wednesday's tragic shooting at satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in Paris, standing in solidarity
I am not a Muslim. The driver had made the assumption that since the colour of my skin was brown, I must believe in Islam. Thirdly, not all who follow Islam are terrorists. In fact, the grand majority of them are not. A terrorist is someone who commits an act of terror. An act of terror is an act of violence or intimidation, done in the pursuit of political gain. One does not to be a member of any particular religion or creed to become a terrorist.
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I understand the nature of cultural and religious sensitivity. I believe in debate and free speech. What happened this past week put the two ideas -- free speech and religious sensitivity -- at polar opposites. I had realized that after we printed the clarification that the staff at The Eyeopener probably didn't fully understand the implications of our statement. We were accused of ignorance.