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Paul Martin

We should aspire to create an economy that includes and benefits everybody, especially those excluded for so long.
Since announcing this proposal former Ms. Leitch's opposing leadership candidates, interim Conservative Party leader Rona Ambrose and former Prime Minister Brian Mulroney have all condemned the policy. If we subscribe to Trudeau Sr's idea that there is no such thing as a model Canadian, that a society that emphasizes uniformity creates intolerance and hate how can we classify anything as "anti-Canadian"?
"The problem is the gross underfunding by the federal government."
It seemed like everyone in Ottawa knew Mike Robinson far better than I did. And yet, like everyone else, I had been touched by his healthy and warm personality in ways that were unusual in that city. His greatest gift to us all, important or, like me, less so, is the sense of goodness and fairness he left us in a world where cut and thrust are essential tools of the trade. He was good in every way that we could possibly imagine that word.
"They should leave the reserves without a decent education?"
June 6 is the date on which the ban on medical assistance in dying will be formally lifted in Canada.
Here's the thing: social change is not an easy process. It takes effort, stubbornness and the ability to persevere in spite of all obstacles and opposition. Once achieved, social change and any newfound rights and freedoms should never be taken for granted, yet they often are.
Caught up in its contradictions, the NDP hopes nobody will notice. There is the Sherbrooke Declaration NDP, which promises a condition-free right to opt out for the Government of Quebec. And then there is the centralist NDP, which unilaterally sets its childcare plan according to a rigid model incompatible with the contemporary practice of Canadian federalism.
Canada does not follow the U.S. in spending astronomical amounts of funds to develop and purchase weapons and use them in wars. Our health care expense is way lower than that of the U.S. The U.S. spends about 17 per cent of its GDP on health care, whereas the Canada medical share is around 11 per cent. So where has the Canadian government's money gone?
To put it in a local context: the B.C. government is providing unprecedented tax breaks to what is effectively a foreign Crown corporation, where the prime minister is suspected of siphoning off US$700 million from one of its other Crown corporations to his personal bank accounts. Doesn't inspire confidence.