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pensions

Canada’s public sector pension board invested US$4.7 million last year in companies that operate immigrant detention centres.
Cutting pensions is a short-term gain, but it results in long-term pain for many.
Overall, the picture is very different from that portrayed by our politicians.
We all know where the problems are. Disappointingly, the Trudeau government is using the same delaying tactics of its predecessors. Canadians won't ignore this. Veterans were a key issue in the last election and will continue to be until they are treated with respect and compassion.
The Fraser Institute has argued recently that the federal government has failed to make a convincing case for Canada Pension Plan (CPP) expansion. But their viewpoint depends heavily on trying to determine how much income Canadians need to retire with dignity. So, do we really need an expanded CPP?
It is all too easy to talk about principles when you don't have to look into the eyes of a young person and explain why your ideals are more important than their access to a good job and a pension plan on which they can begin to build a life for their families.
Recently the C.D. Howe Institute released a short study just in time for the finance ministers' meeting - rolling out the tired, old argument that as people age, they do not need as much money to live as when they were younger. If only retirement were so easy.
Fifty years ago we fixed the problem through vision and leadership by creating the CPP. Today we need to fortify the CPP to give future generations of Canadians confidence that they can live with dignity when their working life comes to an end. It's a proven and sensible approach.
There will be a lot on the line for Canadian workers and business owners. But it's not too late to put the brakes on a proposal that will destroy jobs, hold back wages and even push some businesses over the edge in years to come.
I want to thank Bruce Moncur for his piece, "Trudeau's Liberals Anything But Sunny Ways For Veterans," and for attending Veterans Affairs Canada's (VAC) stakeholder summit on May 9 to 10. To date, it was the department's largest and best-attended, and he made some invaluable contributions both as a member of the greater assembly and individually when we had an opportunity to speak one-on-one during a lunch break. Bruce points out in his piece that Budget 2016 did not include all of the items in the mandate letter I received from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau when I took office as minister of veterans affairs in November 2015. He's right.