HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

perception

A need exists for rapid change in the social mindset of the next generation on antibiotics. If our youth do not appreciate the challenges facing public health officials today, they may end up living under the shadow of untreatable bacterial infections known as the post-antibiotic era.
We've heard it before: Leadership drives behaviour. Model the way. Leadership is intelligence, honesty and doing the right
I can think of many times when I ignored what I saw in a person or a situation. Initially, it seems so much easier to see what we prefer to see, rather than face the unpleasant truth of what's actually there. Still, what I've realized is that no matter how difficult it is to acknowledge the signs of trouble in our relationships or environment, it's always better to do so.
When you need information or want to build a relationship with a client, colleague, team member, manager or stakeholder, it is really all about the questions you ask, how much you let the other person talk and how you listen.
Not that many years ago the first time you were seen by other professionals and colleagues was in an interview, the first day on a new job or in a social setting. Now, it is common for people to Google you or find you on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram or Facebook to gather up a first impression of who you are before job interviews, as your new position in a company has been announced, or after hearing about you from someone.
How an individual perceives him/herself is either a real or distorted view of who they believe they really are, not always who they actually are, or how others see them for that matter. People either develop a positive or a negative self-image based upon their perception of a past experience or event. Therefore, an individual's strengths and weaknesses are a direct manifestation of how a person evaluates themselves.
"No Pop" is about changing this self-imposed, self-perpetuating wheel of regulation and can do so without condescension toward the pursuit of monetary success. All that would need to, and should, change, is the perception of what makes music "commercial."
We can't be Sally Field on Oscar night all the time. We will all be served with harsh criticisms, strange accusations, and cruel comments every once in a while, and it's how we deal with it that really demonstrates the true nature of our character. If you know who you are and strive to be the best person that you can be, you have nothing to worry about.
When I first heard that the U.S. cable channel, TNT, was producing a series about a neuroscientist with paranoid schizophrenia called Perception, I was ecstatic. After recently watching it on the Bravo network in Canada and I was even more appalled. The writers seemingly got halfway through "Psych 101" in college, dropped out and went on to write for television.
Cognitive psychologists have discovered that our brains reduce women to their sexual body parts, and treat those parts as objects. The data confirms what many of us have suspected all along: we objectify women without even thinking about it. But does that mean that sexism is an inevitable result of our physiology? That's not so easy to answer.