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physicians

What makes people sick? Infectious agents like bacteria and viruses and personal factors like smoking, eating poorly and living a sedentary lifestyle. But none of these compares to the way that poverty makes us sick. Prescribing medications and lifestyle changes for our patients who suffer from income deficiency isn't enough; we need to start prescribing healthy incomes. The upstream factors that affect health -- such as income, education, employment, housing, and food security -- have a far greater impact on whether we will be ill or well. Of these, income has the most powerful influence, as it shapes access to the other health determinants.
Given all the growing research evidence on alternative therapies I wonder if our current medical system is old. Both the insurance companies and the government have not kept up with time. These services are scientifically studied to help, so is this truly a universal health care?
A biosimilar drug is a biologic medicine made from a living organism or cell. By embracing biosimilars into Canadian health care, patients will benefit from safe and effective treatment options at a lower cost, and our health-care system will be that much more sustainable as a result.
Six years ago, my husband Matthew was diagnosed with glioblastoma multiform, the most common and deadliest of brain cancers. As Matthew's primary caregiver, I've come to recognize that coping in the face of a terminal illness is a learned skill, and sometimes it takes a lot of trial and error to figure out what works.
Current media reports have highlighted that doctors can legally demand a fee to fill out this form because it is not an insured service. But really, the difference between the medical document and a prescription is clearly one of semantics. By paying hundreds of dollars to have doctors fill out medical documents, we are inadvertently reinforcing the stigma surrounding cannabis for medical purposes -- the idea that there is something "illegitimate" about cannabis' therapeutic potential and the patients who use it.
Although female physicians do work somewhat fewer hours than male physicians -- and indeed work differently in general -- there is no strong evidence that this difference has or will have any significant effect on the overall effective supply of family practitioners in Canada.
Mr. Alexander, I turn to you for guidance on what to do the next time this patient comes to my clinic: a gay man who fled his country because it is a crime to be homosexual. This man who was beaten and persecuted by his community and his family. He is not able to work in Canada because he can not acquire a work visa and instead volunteers with local charities.
If the current investment in physician compensation was intended to improve the accessibility of medical care, then the data from Quebec show that this was a policy failure. Not only was there no improvement, but the problem actually worsened. In Quebec, it appears we are investing more money to pay more physicians to get less care.
The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of the United Kingdom says pregnant women should make an effort to avoid exposures to chemicals in consumer products. The dogs have started barking right away, with critics immediately slamming the obstetricians for scaremongering.