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political ads

The Canada Elections Act sets the rules on who can buy a political ad during a campaign.
Campaigns are an opportunity for political parties to bolster their own favour and increase their support, while simultaneously criticizing the opposition. Unsavoury advertising has become par for the course during election season. But this year, one advertising campaign has been turning heads for a different reason.
Most of Canada's major broadcasters are cracking down on political parties using their material in advertising. In a letter
To my mind, there's actually something much worse than a nasty negative attack ad, and that's a saccharine, upbeat positive ad. To me this is worse than coarsening culture, it's dulling culture, it's taking what should be an exciting rough and tumble debate and turning it into a boring syrupy goo.
Conservatives are using embattled torrent site The Pirate Bay, known for making movies and music illegally available, to
Whether or not you view a political ad as "negative" often depends on your partisan political point of view. The NDP recently released a negative T.V. attack ad that is so blatantly negative it almost comes across as an attack ad parody. Yet when I went on Twitter and described it as such, I was immediately met with protests. How can you ban something like attack ads when political partisans don't believe they exist?