Political Correctness

He also warned against the "forces of political correctness."
While I can see that some people feel their representation was taken away, this is not a real-life story where someone is being misrepresented.
I firmly believe that bringing levity and shining a light on any tragic topic helps alleviate the fear and horror of it all. However, it wasn't until a couple of years ago when my beloved mother and kindred spirit unexpectedly passed away that I truly took up a near-permanent residence on the dark side of humour.
Trump's words are coming back to haunt him - and his Muslim ban is being found discriminatory, and therefore unconstitutional, by court after court. By being, you know, "politically incorrect," what he said outside the courtroom is now being used to hammer him inside the courtroom. And it's simply wonderful.
A strange phenomenon has been happening over the past decade or so that has stifled great debates, great conversation. I did not truly understand the magnitude of the problem until I began receiving messages from people on Facebook after getting into debates with strangers about one of those hot-button topics. The messages are almost always identical; 'Hey James, just wanted to let you know that I agree with a lot of the points you made today. But I can't jump in because I don't want to get fired from my job.'
The reality is that every single person who wants to engage in free expression on university must deal with the campus thought police, first. The Canadian Taxpayer Federation's (CTF) student initiative, Generation Screwed, which deals with government debt and fiscal issues, has had its own share of challenges.
Gender inclusivity isn't about young people being too "sensitive," as a professor at the University of Toronto would have us believe. It is about people having access to facilities that many of us take for granted. And it is about dignity. It is about human rights.
The media site that published the headline doesn't think so, but others sure do.
With the entire continent engaged in some of the most polarizing politics seen in decades, everyone seems to have one thing in common: Everyone thinks people these days are too easily offended. But they aren't. They're no different than they've ever been. And, as for political correctness, it doesn't exist.
Since the 1980s, it's been used to diminish and discredit efforts to reduce racism, sexism, homophobia, Islamophobia, ableism and other forms of discrimination. But despite people like Donald Trump declaring "I'm so tired of this politically correct crap," the efforts remain because the issues have not gone away.