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population

Demanding constant economic growth on a finite planet with limited ability to renew resources is a recipe for overshoot.
The longer we delay addressing environmental problems, the more difficult it will be to resolve them. Although we've known about climate change and its potential impacts for a long time, and we're seeing those impacts worsen daily, our political representatives are still approving and promoting fossil fuel infrastructure as if we had all the time in the world to slow global warming.
In recent years, an aging population and the rise of non-traditional marriages have become issues that are increasingly relevant to estate planning considerations in Canada. As society shifts over time, it is important that estate planning methods and strategies are capable of adaptation to suit changing needs.
Since I've moved to Vancouver in February of last year I've become accustomed to daily news updates on the real estate market. There are other towns like Squamish that are on the winning end of the housing crisis in Vancouver -- these towns are getting young families that will one day help their town prosper.
The ratio of working-age Canadians to seniors was narrowing, and the inevitable outcome would be a shrunken tax base and acute labour shortages. Over the next decade, a million jobs risk going unfilled. And yet, only around one in 10 Canadians agrees that Canada currently admits too few immigrants. The annual (and sometimes multi-year) public consultations held by the Federal Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration on levels of newcomers do not seem to have yielded much success in changing this attitude.
The world's population won't grow as quickly over the next 50 years as it did over the past 50, and Canada will be among the losers in the new reality.
The oilsands boom is reshaping Canada in many ways, and nowhere is this more obvious than where people are moving. We've
Canada faces a big demographic shift over the next 50 years, with a growing number of seniors and a movement of people to
Africa's 600 million hectares of uncultivated land -- more than half the global total -- adds up to a recipe for a better food future. Agricultural innovation, education, and the resulting empowerment of women and girls promises to make the coming population boom a turning point toward truly sustainable development.
But empty or not, we wouldn't want to live anywhere else 50 per cent live in just the red regions If every person got a dot