pq

The party named longtime member of the legislature Sylvain Gaudreault as interim leader on Friday.
"We will take the appropriate steps to ensure we demonstrate the advantages and benefits of Quebec independence."
Transport Minister Robert Poeti said Wednesday "the status quo was no longer possible," regarding his decision to let go
Jacques Parizeau was a passionate and principled man who believed in Quebec's independence, but he was at times a divisive politician. Judging by the many hateful comments I saw last night, his "money and the ethnic vote" speech after the razor-thin Quebec independence referendum loss in 1995 will continue to haunt his legacy. The over-the-top indignation I'm seeing from some is getting on my nerves. Is that one sentence from 20 years ago the only thing some of you can remember from his entire political legacy? Parizeau was so much more than just a rant, more than just one ugly moment in time.
QUEBEC - The former Parti Quebecois government admitted Thursday it never asked the Justice Department whether its proposed
Marois seemed panicky in attacking Couillard Tuesday at a press conference in Verdun, and in a seemingly desperate attempt, brought up Arthur Porter and Couillard's apparent close connection. The PQ is apparently planning on phasing Marois out of their election strategy, by replacing her with the more popular Bernard Drainville and his baby; la charte.
Recently, a former Quebec journalist argued that Canada's mainstream broadcasters were hypocritical for seeming to lend a sympathetic ear to those opposing the proposed Charter of Values. "Not a kippa, hijab, cross or turban in sight. Religious symbols are, quite simply, not part of the TV news uniform; never have been," wrote Micheal Dean in the Globe and Mail. And while he's right in that there are few Canadian journalists sporting symbols of their faith, the premise for his argument needs to be turned on its head. Rather than justify the Parti Québécois's bid to limit freedom of religion in its public institutions, the media's lack of representation of diverse communities must be called out for what it is: a letdown for democracy.
They want to control what you wear. Yes, I'm talking about the Quebec Charter of Values. It will allow the state to tell you what you can and cannot wear as well as what you can and cannot say. As one Prince Arthur Herald editorial also described, it won't only affect people who are religious.
Premier Pauline Marois, first elected to a minority mandate 18 months ago, announced the April 7 vote Wednesday after meeting
MONTREAL - The Parti Quebecois says it could amend its controversial values charter based on public input it receives before