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premiers

Brian Pallister begged Manitobans to follow the rules, even if they don’t like him.
The most popular premiers in Canada are in B.C. and Quebec.
For the longest time, a photo of the premiers assembled could be mistaken for a photo of a fraternity or a really unsuccessful boy band.
Government policy should seek to leverage the federalist tradition. This means more local experimentation, less central planning, and empowering provincial and local governments to advance provincial and local interests in their respective constitutional spheres without federal meddling or pressure to conform.
Working people understand the importance of a decent job and a well-funded health care system, and the connection between the two. Labour leaders are in Whitehorse this week to make sure that message gets through to our provincial leaders, and through them to our prime minister.
Harper, Mulcair, and Trudeau may want to be seen with some of these folks. Others? Not so much.
While the majority of Canadians see climate change as a serious threat to the planet, Canada has no climate legislation and, according to Environment Canada, growing emissions from the Alberta oilsands will prevent the country from meeting its emission reduction targets under the Copenhagen Accord.
B.C. Premier Christy Clark is ending 2014 with her approval rating essentially unchanged — but her ranking still lands her
The provincial leaders voted most and least popular in a new Angus Reid survey should come as no surprise. Saskatchewan Premier
I see the premiers are upset that Prime Minister Harper will not be attending their next session on the economy in Halifax next November. We can almost certainly guarantee that if the Prime Minister went to the November meeting each and every premier would find plenty of opportunities to go in front of the media to castigate the Prime Minister on a long list of issues. In turn the Prime Minister would then be forced to respond to their attacks during his media availability. Certainly that is not the best way to have reasonable well-thought out discussions on the economy or on any other issue for that matter. Why should Harper risk it?