HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

presentations

It's the most common question I get asked by those who deal with a fear of public speaking: "Should I picture my audience
Silent prayer aside, there are many things that can derail your speaking awesomeness. Technology, traffic, timing, too-tight shoes and other terrible things can wreak havoc on the unprepared speaker. Luckily, most of these things can be avoided with a little planning.
Vocalists often talk about "feeling" the lyrics. It's no different when you are at the front of the room presenting on any topic. Great AV, proper breathing, knowing your material and staying within your allotted time all help your presentation. However, you need much more to deliver a memorable versus a solid presentation.
Rather than taking control of the room, have you ever had self-doubt and a surge of discomfort envelope you as you are being introduced? Has your mouth suddenly gone dry and does the microphone always seem to act up? Do you ever lose concentration and draw a blank? These and other personal nervous habits often rear their heads when we are standing before an audience.
In August 2015, Mohammed Quatani was crowned the winner of the 2015 Toastmasters World Championship of Public Speaking with his speech, The Power of Words. Mohammed rose above 30,000 contestants to take this prestigious title in the finals of the world's largest public speaking contest.
Giving up the reigns puts someone else in the driver's seat, which is a guaranteed recipe for calamity. Trust me, every pitch you'll make will be challenged... but the longer your maintain control, the more powerful a base (and shield) you build. What's more, you may inadvertently address, even eliminate, someone's genuine concern as your presentation rolls on to its finish.
You most likely won't make $41 million off your first business presentation, but you DO need a deck which clearly lays out a few key things which all venture capitalists (and potential partners) look for. It seems easy, but one of the hardest exercises you will go through in this process is distilling everything you think, want, and believe in your company into a measly 10 pages. Here are some tips.
While I may brief the speakers on the audience, their backgrounds and occupations, I can't predict the personality style of all those involved, which in turn impacts how they learn best and that's why some people will love a presentation, and others hate it. So here are some tips on how to read your audience!
Looking for new customers or clients? One way to showcase your business and expertise is to offer seminars or workshops. Now, public speaking can be a scary thought to many, so here are some tips to get you started.