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president obama

When I first heard about the Women's March on Washington back in November, I felt called to get involved. I've used my words and my voice over the years, but have never physically marched. It was finally the time! I decided to stand with the thousands of other concerned citizens and march in solidarity here in Toronto.
She inspired Americans to be more caring and respectful toward one-another, as she never treated anyone with less than the utmost respect. For that reason, she won the love, respect and admiration of her fellow Americans. Many First Ladies are respected and admired, it's true, but few were as deeply loved as Mrs. Obama has been.
The last eight years have hardly been America's finest. Through it all, however, this family has stood tall -- resolute, proud, dignified. Never letting on how hurt, how insulted, how devastated, how disappointed and yes, how justifiably angry they must have been, may still be, may always be.
He is well within his legal rights to run both the country and his company. There is not a damn thing anyone can do about it. You could argue that it's corrupt, or that it's unethical, but we shouldn't hold our breath waiting for either Donald Trump or Congress to embrace the notion of ethics.
Remember Donald Trump's campaign speeches when he was the Republican presidential candidate? All those promises he made? How his supporters lapped it all up? How loudly they cheered? How madly they waved their placards and signs? How riled up they got?
The whole speech was an hymn for democracy, aiming to remind us that after all this time, since democracy was first born here in Greece, its flame still fuels the progress of our society. He reminded us that democracy is neither perfect, nor complete.
They told me and many others to go back to where we came from. In due time, the campaign would be embraced by the electorate, especially among African Americans, whose loyalty of the Clinton's is often unhealthy and concerning.
Last night I watched one of my favourite movies, A Face in the Crowd. Favourite not in terms of feel-good, but unsettling
I've loved politics pretty much my entire adult life, both Canadian and U.S. I've always been an enthusiastic and avid follower and I've been known to watch every rally, speech and debate. I've also been known to stay up half the night waiting for the last vote to be counted.
The situation in both the U.S. and the U.K. indicates disenchantment with conventional political elites. Donald Trump has been playing heavily to white voters who have seen an erosion of jobs, and for those with jobs, no real wage growth. Against this backdrop of polarization, political discontent, uncertainty and nationalism comes Canada.