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property rights

One of the legal tests is "substantial interference."
Robertson's vacancy and Airbnb taxes are a significant stumble down a slippery slope. If these new taxes don't raise the vacancy rate high enough, will he go after unoccupied suites in homes? Empty bedrooms? If private housing is now a social good, with its use essentially controlled through tax and regulation, what's to stop these next steps?
A First Nations person on reserve does not enjoy fee simple ownership and does not have the same property rights as all other Canadians who live off reserve. According to the Indian Act, First Nations reserve land is held in trust for on-reserve members by the federal government -- essentially making on-reserve First Nations people wards of the state.
Once budget matters fade from the news, population growth, oil and gas exploration, agricultural demands, recreational use, and an increasing ecological sensitivity will likely again swirl around land use issues--private property included.
With the recent Russian-inspired tragedies in eastern Ukraine and the war between Israel and Hamas in Gaza, much of the world is understandably focused on those regions. But another continent, Asia, is worth watching, particularly Chinese government action vis-à-vis Hong Kong.
While one can only theorize about the positive impact of including property rights in the Charter, the effect of excluding property rights are demonstrable -- and demonstrably harmful.
How do you enter into a common-law relationships in the first place and when do various rights vest? For those of you living with a partner or considering doing so (or if you have adult children considering same), I suggest that you grab a cup of coffee, sit down and read the following paragraphs a few of times over.
A Canadian court is being asked to adopt Nazi-like tactics: namely, to authorize the theft of property merely because it is slated to be delivered to an owner who is despised on the basis of ideology. The property at stake is a collection of rare coins and artifacts belonging to the estate of Robert McCorkell (sometimes written McCorkill).
Politicians are often derided because they treat the public with disdain, such as when governments try to bury bad news by releasing it when they hope no one pays attention -- say, at the end of a day close to the first long weekend of summer. This happened twice in just the past two weeks.
The government has acted illegally. In British Columbia, the provincial branch of the government continually demands owners of property designated as archaeologically significant pay for archaeological work before any redevelopment can proceed. It's a government arm that deems archaeological finds as publicly significant and should not burden private property owners.