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prostitution laws

As the federal government looks to update its prostitution laws, former U.S. president Jimmy Carter is once again urging
Is sex work inherently and irredeemably wicked, as the abolitionsts would have us conclude? Or is it in fact possible to have a morally defensible prostitution? A testing of public values alone will not answer these questions, assuming they are even answerable. Values are an important and necessary starting point for a discussion of public policy, to be sure, but they are only one element of policy. Given that vulnerable lives are going to be affected, the feds are going to need to come up with a solid policy that has something more beneath it than our deeply-held touchy feelies.
For far too long, Canada's approach to prostitution has been to treat prostitution, and specifically the women involved in it, as a nuisance and not as a form of violence against women. This approach must change. We must shift our approach to recognize that women in prostitution have the right to dignity, equality and most of all, to be free from exploitation and violence.
OTTAWA — Call it the world’s oldest legislative headache. A Conservative government that hoped to restore its fortunes in
Now that the government's hand has been forced, let's hope it will take the view of prostitution it should have all along: seeing and treating it as work. Work that can involve danger and nuisance, yes. Work that most of us would strongly prefer our grown children did not choose. But work just the same. And work that will take place whether the government bans it or not. As the Supreme Court's decision recognized, harsh criminal penalties aren't an acceptable way to address the harms of the sex trade because these penalties just force prostitution underground, making life unconscionably dangerous for sex-workers.
The only difference between me and a woman who prostitutes herself is that the seeds that would have launched me onto a path of prostitution were not watered. In short, "the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being," as the Russian writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn wrote.
Canada's Supreme Court struck down sections of the country's prostitution laws on Friday. The move is seen as a significant
This week the Supreme Court of Canada will hear a landmark appeal in the case of Terri Jean Bedford that challenges the constitutional validity of the sexual solicitation and bawdy house laws. The court will also consider whether the criminal offence of living on the avails of prostitution should be limited to situations of exploitative conduct.
Canada's highest court has unanimously ruled that a former sex worker and an organization run by and for street-based sex workers should be granted public interest standing to challenge the laws related to adult prostitution. It's a long decision, but here is a quick summary of the decision and its implications for our clients and for access to justice for marginalized people across Canada.
Stepping Stone, a sex-workers advocacy group in Nova Scotia, has released a series of ads that remind people that sex workers