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Public Speaking

As a speaker, how we say what we say is crucial to our success in moving our audience. So how do we make sure that when we take that all-important spot in front of the room, we can stay in control of ourselves, and of the audience's attention?
Afflicted with sweaty palms, short breaths, dry mouth or nausea every time you open your mouth to speak in front of a group of strangers? If your answer is yes, then you must also think that public speaking is not your forte. But guess what? Public speaking doesn't come naturally to anyone.
This Forbes article is spot on with its four tips to becoming a thought leader, as outlined below. But from a PR and social media perspective, let's look at how these recommendations fit.
Many studies reveal that people's top fear is public speaking. Their second is death. Although I find that shocking, it's also unfortunate. Like it or not, if you're trying to build a name for yourself (or for your business), you'll benefit from sharing your insights and expertise in a public forum
Listening to others is a humbling experience. So many speakers commit common sins on the podium (remember, you stand on a podium; you stand behind a lectern) and I've resolved this year to avoid them. Here are things I vow to stop saying in my speeches.
Much is written these days about storytelling as a way to make yourself or your business stand out, and it is a strategy that I strongly recommend. Yet recently I have witnessed ways how, as a speaker, it can backfire on you and instead of winning over your audience, can alienate the people listening to your talk. How?
Each year, a minimum of two talks from the TedxToronto stage have made it to TED.com. The conference has grown by leaps and bounds each year, and is now currently one of the top speaker series in Toronto. This year's talks will provoke us to disagree, discuss, share, and challenge our previously held beliefs. Could you ask for anything more?
When you are at a conference for a couple of days and listening to presentations back to back, you really get a sense of what works, and what doesn't and you can learn from that experience. I have heard numerous speakers, and here's my list of what works, and what to avoid.
I was asked to be funny, and to try to mention gadgets, as TED audiences tend to like seeing fancy innovations. Given that my speech was about grief and spirituality, I wasn't sure where to fit in a pen that can be recycled as a plant, or a smart shirt that senses your temperament.
As I continue to hone my public speaking skills, my speaker coach recently asked me a simple question: who do you consider the greatest orators? I rattled off a number of them, such as the obvious J.F. Kennedy, Winston Churchill and Martin Luther King. Then I realized my list comprised entirely of men. So, I had to do more digging.