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quebec charter of values

Emotion, not reason, motivates independence movements. The desire for Quebec's independence is an ethnic project: that of the francophone nation composed of the roughly 77 per cent of Quebec's people sharing a common language, history, and culture, and who want to maintain its existence in North America. The project has no meaning otherwise.
Recently, Quebec has witnessed very alarming anti-Muslim and anti-Islam rhetoric that has led to moral onslaught against citizens of Muslim faith. The discriminatory campaigns against any group of citizens due to their religious or ethnic background will lead to unhealthy social harmony within any society.
But Pauline Marois lost the game to Philippe Couillard. By choosing to openly flaunt the card of an unwanted referendum and sovereign Quebec, she is caught in her own trap. And by inadvertently bringing to light the aspect of her privileged profile, she has fallen out among the province's populace.
With the Parti Québécois (PQ) trailing in the polls, the architect behind Quebec's Charter of Values said that students should
Don't like the Quebec Charter of Values? Then this is for you. The following infographic, which was posted to Reddit on Tuesday
Montreal artist Marina Totino committed a creative act of electoral sign defacement. Totino drew a hijab on a Pauline Marois
2012-04-27-mediabitesreal.jpg What does it say about Canada that two of the most popular things in the country right now are the Quebec Charter of Values and Rob Ford? We're continuously told these things are, in fact, grossly unpopular. But if the polls are to be believed, both actually enjoy a larger, stabler base of loyalists than many of the people doing the loudest scolding.
Let's call Bill 60 what it truly is: a bill that encourages intolerance, divides the population and makes visible and religious minorities into second class citizens in their own home. It is time for the opposition to step up and stop this nonsense. Until then I remain Canadian, Quebecker, a visibly practicing Muslim and proud.
Quebec's Muslim women have been threatened -- violence against veiled women has increased dramatically since the Charter debate was introduced. In Quebec, the issue of choice and self-determination around the veil is critical. It would seem, then, that in matters of fashion, religion, and secularism, Montreal's Muslim women are being held to a higher standard by their provincial government. Montreal's young Hijabistas -- and those who support them -- told us what the veil means to them.
For reference, this is what he usually looks like. Because the tenor of the debate over Quebec's proposed "Charter of Values