quebec election 2012

For the naysayers or eye-rollers out there, there is nothing wrong with removing my hijab or other article of clothing for a doctor if it is necessary for the sake of the medical examination. In this instance, it was not. It was the equivalent of asking a woman to fully remove her top and undergarment in order to examine her lungs. The changes in the environment in Quebec are subtle but ever present. I have felt the chill in the air. From the racial slur while at the movies with my kids to reading passive aggressive comments on social media. Our joie de vivre, pride in diversity and bilingualism has been replaced with political unease, targeted discrimination of visibly religious minorities and linguistic force.
Last September, while swimming against a tidal wave of negative public opinion, I predicted the BC Liberal Party led by Premier Christy Clark would win the May 2013 election. Understandably, most readers scoffed. I can assure you that I am no Nostradamus. Don't bother asking me which stock to pick or what the 649 Lottery numbers will be. Rather, I relish being a contrarian. It is my nature to question the prevailing view on a range of topics - politics in particular - and to hopefully stir intelligent debate.
After the second protest in the last two weeks following a provincial summit on higher education, everything about Montreal's current spring weather seemed to have year-old Maple Spring undertones to it, including violence, arrests and injuries. The plight of student debt, post graduation underemployment, and rising housing costs are all unarguably quite legitimate burdens faced by my generation. Will free tuition as demanded by the Association pour une solidarité syndicale étudiante (ASSÉ) and its followers solve these zeitgeist conundrums? Unlikely.
Some real estate agents in Ontario say many Quebecers have been eager to leave the province since the Parti Québécois was
Looks like Godwin's Law is still in full effect. At least in the case of the Internet discussion on incoming Quebec premier
The brilliance of the result of the Quebec election is in the rejection of the government without any real endorsement of the Parti Quebecois or its program. The apparent, emergent premier, the desperately unimpressive Pauline Marois, a bag lady where some distinguished statesmen have preceded her, is, politically speaking, a prisoner in her own body. The PQ barely squeezed ahead of the Liberals, in votes and parliamentary strength, while fudging whether they would even hold a referendum on an ambiguous question. This is a cruel, vegetative state for Ms. Marois, a strident separatist. This brilliant election changed governments without breaking any furniture or burning any bridges.
Over the last year, the provinces of Ontario, Alberta and Québec were called to renew their representatives in their respective provincial legislatures. But Contrary to the trend in Ontario and Alberta, where the revelation of a candidate's bias would stain a campaign, Parti Québecois rose in the polls following the aforementioned disturbing disclosures, and even managed to win a minority government.
VANCOUVER - Quebecers voted for change, to be sure — but the mandate they gave the Parti Quebecois isn't anywhere near robust
Celebration turned to horror as a man opened fire during a victory speech by PQ leader Pauline Marois in Montreal Tuesday
MONTREAL - Charges are expected soon in a shooting that may have targeted Quebec's premier-in-waiting, an act that has sent