HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

radicalization

In his mandate letter to Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau included the creation of an Office of the Community Outreach and Counter-radicalization Coordinator. But there is a lack of consensus among academic experts that these counter-radicalization programs are scientifically reliable.
When it comes to countering radicalization, Canadian policy has a different problem. While the U.S. is pursuing a response to radicalization which actually feeds the problem it is supposed to be addressing, the Canadian response of late has been to effectively deny the reality of the conflict that we are in.
This persecution has personally affected me and continues to cause me great pain, grief and sorrow. I'd like to fall in love with Pakistan again, but something holds me back. It seems to be fear of continuing to lose those that I love most. And so, I have to ask, O Pakistan, when will you stop?
If our social media profiles can tint in support of Paris, Belgium, and Orlando, then why not change for Turkey, Bangladesh, and Iraq? Innocent lives taken in Turkey airport, and no vigils, or landmarks, but when an attack of similar degree took place in Brussels we did all of the above. I'm often asked why Muslims don't speak out enough, but perhaps this is something we all need to work on.
Is it too much to ask in the 21st century to self-identify based on the beliefs you hold so dearly? After all, who has the right to tell me who I am and who I'm not? Apparently the Pakistani government does, who have declared the Ahmadiyya community "infidel" and non-Muslim since the infamous ruling in 1974.
But they should be enlisted to reduce any violent radicalization in their midst.
"Injustice anywhere, is a threat to justice everywhere." These words of Martin Luther King Jr. accurately describe the world crisis we live in today. To avoid war and attacks as such, all nations must come together for the greater good and unite in their efforts to stop all forms of cruelty, persecution and injustice perpetrated in the name of religion or else wise.
De-radicalization is really about a process moving toward disengagement. Academic research supports that changing what is in someone's head is difficult and may be impossible, as it isn't something we can "see, feel, taste" -- but their actions are. Disengagement means the bias present within the individual is something they have moved away from, and that should be our goal.
What would motivate someone leading a seemingly normal life -- playing in a band, fussing about his grades, spending a bit of time on the hockey rink -- to leave his family and friends, get rid of his belongings, and scrape up the money to travel to one of the most dangerous parts of the world to join an organization that crucifies and beheads its enemies? And why are so many young people, those raised as Muslims and those who were not, making the same journey to join ISIS?
The responsibility of tackling, addressing and finding drastic solutions for violent radicalism is a duty that should be spread over the shoulder of the society's stakeholders as well as decision-makers, community, media, "religious" groups, social experts, families and others.