ransomware

Hackers obtained an unknown amount of information from the company's 15 million customers.
The attack affected any government service that required electronic access.
Is it safe to go online after two major ransomware attacks in as many months? I would bet many would say, 'you've got to
Ransomware is effective because it often arrives via an infected email attachment, like a Microsoft Word or Excel document, appearing to be from someone you know. Once you open the attachment on a vulnerable computer, it starts to run and can lock the files on your computer and network server without your knowledge.
"This one wasn't really a targeted attack at all."
"There's no barrier to do it tomorrow to 100 million computers.''
The health care industry is unique. Highly regulated, highly specialized, and in possession of highly confidential information, it's a natural target for cyber-attacks. With the rise of internet-connected devices and the industry lagging behind modern cyber security, now more than ever IT decision-makers in health care need to think about how to best protect patient information in the modern threat landscape.
Stories of increasingly vicious cyber-attacks have dominated the headlines this year. It seems like every day we wake up to news of another attack on the scale of the Yahoo data breach, the Democratic National Committee hack, or the NSA source code leak.
When we consider the range of cyber-threats, we generally imagine external attackers -- foreign states, criminal underworlds or lone script kiddies. But the reality is that a large proportion of vulnerabilities and "threats" that organizations face today come from legitimate network users.
If anything, the modern threat landscape encourages attacks on small, vulnerable businesses. And 60 per cent of the time, those small businesses will go under within six months of a cyber-attack. So while massive data breaches dominate the news, they only scratch the surface.