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regulation

Hundreds of thousands of videos depicting the deadly attack proliferated online.
In Canada, merchants pay much more than businesses in other parts of the world for accepting credit card payments.
The ability to offer a price is itself a form of communication, if not of speech. The freedom to differentiate product, service and price is at the heart of a market economy. Courts in Netherlands, Sweden, and Slovenia have struck down restrictions on zero rating. For the most part, the world's telecom regulators are permissive, if not encouraging, of a practice that creates competition and allows different people to meet their needs at different price points. The CRTC is going in the opposite direction of the world's telecom regulators; it seems to believe that it knows better than the user herself.
"Autonomous Vehicles" (AV') - recall a futuristic scene with robots delivering your mail and drones dropping the latest smartphone
Legalization of all non medical use of drugs is an attainable goal. But confronting the opioid crisis is an urgent and unprecedented call to action. Public health experts and their activist allies are leading the way. Let's not get caught up in complicated and protracted arguments about legalization of all drugs.
CETA, the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement, has everyone talking about Canada in Brussels, the EU capital, ahead of February 15's vote - and it's not always good. So, here is a tip for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau ahead of his Thursday speech at the European Parliament.
Provinces should follow the lead of Manitoba, Quebec and British Columbia and reduce their needlessly heavy regulatory burdens. They should do so for the sake of all Canadians, from the owners of businesses large and small, on down to little girls who just want to run a lemonade stand without being harassed.
Like many diagnoses of slow growth, the effects of bad government policies often get overlooked. This matters because unlike commodity swings or global forces, governments can actually influence the direction of policy. But in recent years, we've seen an onslaught of growth-hindering policies in Canada such as spending-induced debt increases, higher taxes and increased regulation.
Despite criminal prohibition and the prospect of becoming ill or even dying, people still do drugs. So we are faced with a wrenching dilemma: Do we, as a society, take over and regulate the supply and quality of drugs or do we leave these issues to the forces of an unbridled market operating in a dark underworld?
Over the last few years, triclosan has been the subject of much debate. Those in favour of these products hail their ability to keep bacteria at bay. Those against suggest there is no real benefit in everyday consumer home use whereas the risks -- both to humans and the environment -- are too great.