renters

In a step to support renters with rent stability and some measure of protection for rental rights, the province of Ontario has officially passed new rental legislation on May 18, 2017. The Rental Fairness Act, 2017, resolves significant issues that renters have been battling.
The company managing the unit says it was aware of the system.
If you've ever rented before, especially in a building, you might remember (either fondly or with hate) that one spot where everyone left their disregarded items. They weren't necessarily unwanted items, in fact oftentimes they were great household objects that someone just didn't need anymore.
Hopefully during your life as a renter you haven't had to rely on the Residential Tenancies Act too much. If that's not the case, you're likely well versed in some part of your rights, but maybe not all of them. Many of us renters rely on hearsay information we've picked up over the years and as it turns out, a lot of it is misconstrued or, in some cases, completely wrong.
While some associations feel that the Ontario Residential Tenancies Act currently favours tenants (although associations representing tenants will disagree), there are proposed changes being debated that could shift the power back into the hands of the landlord.
Landlords normally know what they want -- a good, clean tenant that pays on time and doesn't destroy the rental unit. You know what you want if you're looking for your own place. But when you're selling yourself as a roommate, it's a little harder.
We all have our deal breakers when it comes to rental flooring. Maybe you hate carpet, maybe you can't deal with linoleum or maybe you despise tile. Me, I hate parquet. And when I say parquet, I mean the cheap generic stuff you find in apartment buildings, not the beautiful 17th century flooring in Versailles. I'm not insane, obviously those floors are gorgeous.
Finding a good rental unit for a decent price is hard enough as it is without the added task of finding one that is pet-friendly, too. I can accept that not everyone loves dogs as much as I do, but does that mean they can deny me a nice apartment, charge me a fee or evict me?
Renters are far more likely to break condo rules regarding noise and upkeep of the common amenities, resulting in the degradation of the complex. A complex that is heavily rented out becomes stigmatized as apartment building, unappealing to potential buyers.