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resume tips

It's a new year and in the new year, people start thinking new beginnings: "It's time to start looking for a job." The problem is, how can you make your resume stand out amongst all the others? How can you be the chosen one? Here are five tips to make your resume stand out in front of the virtual crowd.
It's very common for people to take time out of their careers to travel, work on personal projects, and care for loved ones, among many other reasons. It's no longer frowned upon in the way it may have been 10 or 20 years ago, so it's OK to be upfront about time out on your resume.
Canadian employers, recruiters and postsecondary admissions staff are beginning to recognize the value of taking a gap year, but just taking time off from school or work doesn't quite cut it.
I'm often asked about the most valuable steps that people should take to further their careers -- especially as the fall approaches and people are back to work with a refreshed sense of ambition. While several things will move your CV to the top of the pile -- academic excellence, measurable accomplishments and impressive recommendations -- this is a surefire where to make you stand out from the crowd.
Every person reacts to a layoff in a different way. In the immediate aftermath, you'll likely experience a range of emotions, from sadness to anger, to fear and frustration -- possibly even relief. And at some point while you're processing this unexpected life change, you'll be met with a big question: Now what?
"Oh gimme a break, not another 'results-oriented, hard-working, team player.'" Self-descriptions like these turn up in so many resumes that they don't serve to differentiate candidates anymore. In fact, they have the opposite effect by making the job seeker appear generic and cookie-cutter. Stop trying to describe yourself.
t job we get post-graduation is not going to be the one we remain in for our entire career. The days of spending decades at the same company are, by and large, behind us. Some may switch jobs once or twice, but others may have to cut their teeth in a dozen positions before finding the right fit.
As a headhunter, I call people who are sitting at their desk already working, and as a recruiter, I get resumes and emails from people seeking employment. The difference between the two is extraordinary. If you are looking for work and wondering why no one is calling or emailing you back, here are the real reasons you aren't getting a job.
The first impression that employers most often have of candidates is through their resume. It is critical to stand out from the crowd of generic applications with a document that really sells your skills and accomplishments. This deserves more than a cut and paste of new job details into an old template.
Going back to work after taking time off to stay at home with your kids can be a daunting experience. By following these six tips, you can fill the resume gap with the unique skills you developed while staying at home and be on the way to landing your dream career.