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return on investment

Studies demonstrate the average business professional spends approximately 90% of their time writing and reading business email. I've seen first-hand that learning to write better emails helps participants get more done in less time, and it helps organizations and individuals improve their reputation.
It's about choosing the right consultant or strategist that will give you such a ridiculous return on your investment that laying down the cash isn't even a question. That's what ROI is - you invest, and you get a return. It's that simple.
As the digital revolution continues to transform the way in which companies market their products to consumers, brands and agencies are facing a whole new set of challenges previously unencountered in the industry. There remains industry-wide confusion as to how to effectively track the success metrics of both content and content distribution.
If you're holding cash, you've beaten the TSX by 12 per cent.
In most situations, measuring the return on investment (ROI) is the best way to determine marketing impact. However strictly
Understanding your target online audience is a key process in order to achieve objectives such as increasing sales and leads. To some, this can be a daunting process, but there are three simple ways to get to know your audience: testing, leveraging analytic platforms and doing competitor research.
The only constraint when a corporation decides to work on its credibility is the time, and in business, time is cash. People do not realize how long it could be to build a credibility sound enough to help them to get out of a crisis situation or to build a relationship with stakeholders. We often say that it takes years to build credibility and it takes hours to lose, and it is so true.
Canadians of all ages go back to school in September, but learning that takes place outside the classroom is increasingly being recognized as a key factor for a thriving economy and a fulfilling life.
Consider the rise of Likelihood to Recommend (L2R) as a business metric with growing appeal. Many large businesses have collapsed complex success metrics to judge their own business by asking customers: "Would you recommend me to others?" -- the foundation of L2R or Net Promoter Scores (NPS).
Every corporation has a culture. Some are more "in your face" than others -- such as those that kick-off meetings with a corporate cheer -- and, if you've never really worked anywhere else, you might not even realize it's there.