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revenge porn

"Images are being used to control, abuse and humiliate people."
‘We hope that this will inspire other social media companies to take similar action’
It's not cyber-bullying, it's cyber-rape. Imagine you receive an email containing a naked picture of you in a sexual position. You remember, that one that you sent your lover. The email is linked to a site where more images of your naked and vulnerable body are displayed followed by hateful comments, complete strangers tearing you apart, a cybermob virtually raping you. The site includes your full name, your home address, your contact information. Some of the commenters threaten to come to your home and rape you.
A Vancouver woman has won her fight to remove nude photos her ex-boyfriend posted on the Internet. Anisa Salmi, 27, was shocked
On several occasions, police and prosecutors have used the child pornography provisions in the Criminal Code to address incidents of teen "sexting." The fact that these offences can 'catch' this kind of conduct has led some commentators to argue that there is no compelling reason to enact the proposed offence of "non-consensual distribution of intimate images." I disagree.
For the last year I've been speaking and writing at length about the issue Bill C-13 claims to tackle. While the bill's name in the press is the "Cyber-bullying Bill," the more specific problem addressed by components of Bill C-13 is known as "revenge porn," a term I hate for both its inaccuracy and sexualized sensationalism. After a year of arguing for legislation that criminalizes cyber-sexual assault, I cannot support the legislation as written. I cannot trade one set of civil rights for another. We should separate the components of Bill C-13 that deal directly with cyber-sexual assault from those that do not, and debate them as different pieces of legislation.
It starts to feel like a no win situation, or as Mr. Polonetsky puts it, as though "the data genie is out of the bottle" and there is no turning back. Following the NSA leaks it became clear that Big Brother was watching, and listening -- but so are thousands of little brothers and sisters -- as anyone with smartphone in his or her pocket now holds a powerful surveillance device.
I started really paying attention to local politics when an ex-boyfriend posted nude pictures of me on the Internet without my consent. Certain he had committed a crime, I went straight to the police. But the law enforcement officials I turned to for help only smirked, shrugged their shoulders, and sent me on my way.