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review

You've already taken the time to plan and execute the activity and it's over, so why bother? Whether it's a major project or event, a product launch or an announcement, a digital media campaign or an issues management plan, a post-mortem is important to demonstrate success as well as learning.
Sunday night's series finale, it's obvious, would have made a much better premiere than the pilot did. It was probably the show's best hour.
The way tensions between pipeline opponents and Kinder Morgan contractors have escalated during the last week should come as a surprise to no one. The mishandling of the National Energy Board review of Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain oil pipeline and tanker proposal has created the conditions for the situation now unfolding on the mountainside.
The director must give them life: make each character an individual, make the scenes sing so that the language comes not from the mouth of Shaw, but from the mouths of unique personalities, and make the arguments reflections of character rather than mere elements of Shaw's argument. That's where this Arts Club production really falls apart.
The play itself is interesting enough, and the characters strong enough, to sustain our interest for more than two hours. It premiered in 1954 with Geraldine Page as Lizzie and received a Broadway revival in 1999 with Woody Harrelson as Starbuck. As an exercise for young actors, this production probably works well. As a coherent piece of drama, not so much.
Good performances and a remarkable set by Drew Facey provide an entertaining treatment of a pretty ordinary play.
All actors are always present in the room, and the house lights are on throughout the performance. We are, in a sense, in a living room that surrounds the two kitchens of the main characters.
The new Arts Club production "4000 Miles" is inoffensive, irrelevant, and trite. This much-produced American comedy from 2011 provides warm reassurance that familial love is good. Intended to warm the heart with warm humour, it inadvertently challenges us to care about the obnoxious protagonist. But a lack of story is the play's greatest weakness.
Anita Rochon's inspired approach to this maligned play is a great success. She exploits the its weaknesses and makes them strengths. She turns her seven actors into a full cast of 18 using a scheme so clever and funny it occasionally upstages Shakespeare himself. And that's a good thing.
Last Sunday, I spent Jesus's apparent day -- for the first time in nine weeks -- without Breaking Bad. Without Walter White or any of his tics, tendencies, or tacky style. Unlike most who watched Bad, I liked Walter White all the way. I liked him at the beginning, I liked him at the end, and I liked him at his worst.