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rich coleman

News that Premier Christy Clark has spent $500,000 on private jets since assuming office has -- not surprisingly -- raised a few eyebrows. It's a story that has as much to do with the symbolism as it does with the dollars. A political condition that the government seems increasingly tone deaf to as of late.
If the Liberals can make the case in 2017 that they've been good stewards of the public purse and that business is good, it won't matter that they have actually done neither.
Take a gander at the government's economic report cards and one thing becomes readily apparent: an almost virtual absence of inter-provincial comparisons. There's a good reason for that. Compared to Alberta, Ontario and Quebec, B.C. doesn't always stack up so well.
The B.C. NDP is criticizing the province's Liberal party for a proposal that would hike the percentage by which landlords
B.C. Premier Christy Clark and her Liberal party are celebrating the one-year anniversary of their comeback election victory
Inventive but money-losing social enterprises plus complicated real-estate ventures drove PHS Community Services into a deficit
Riddle me this, Batman: if the formerly bankrupt Edgewater Casino's size and earning potential is capped at current levels, how is it going to manage the costs associated with a massive construction project on prime Vancouver real estate? We're all going to need Bruce Wayne's balance sheet--because the answer is that B.C. and Vancouver tax dollars will get this done through a series of obscure subsidies that will never be returned.
According to documents obtained through Freedom of Information (FOI) legislation, BC Housing, an arm of the provincial housing
B.C. Energy Minister Rich Coleman says nothing is off the table when it comes to smart meters. Speaking at the Vancouver
Legislative oversight is fundamental to good government. And with less and less of it, the government does more and more by decree. B.C. isn't well-served by that. In 2012, the B.C. legislature sat for 47 days. Among its numerous legislative duties: to debate and approve a $44-billion budget. Forty-seven days is simply insufficient to do that and everything else well.