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road safety

The 21-year-old man was driving down a London, Ont. street May 11 when the shooting occurred, police say.
The Humboldt crash reveals that Canada's response to major road incidents is woefully inadequate.
Road safety advocates call SIU decision "shameful."
Fraud must be rooted out and the costs to settle claims must come down.
Much as the manual transmission has all but disappeared in the 21st Century, the idea of driving a car in the manner of a Steve McQueen may soon also be a thing of the past. Autonomous features will almost assuredly become mandatory -- and switching them off could become a too-expensive option.
More than 300 pedestrians are killed by motorists in Canada each year. In Toronto alone, 163 pedestrians have been killed since 2011. But it doesn't have to be this way. Most collisions between pedestrians and vehicles are, one could argue, "by design" -- policy design, that is.
In the name of beautifying streets and the desire to create urban promenades, we often end up with poorly planned arterials that subject pedestrians and others to unnecessary safety risks. Look no further than the Front Street at Union Station in Toronto, where every morning a flood of commuters inundates the neighbouring streets.
On the morning of Oct. 28, 2015, 12 pedestrians were struck by cars in the City of Toronto. While some would say it's the result of a wet, grey day, this statistic follows an average of six pedestrians being hit each day, a stunningly high number set to increase as density intensifies and our population ages.
MOVE OVER.