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Robert pickton

Robert "Willie" Pickton admitted to killing 49 women.
"For him, now, to write about whatever happened or didn’t happen and then throw in Biblical sayings for good measure, I think, is disturbing."
The province and Vancouver are poised to settle their portion of a lawsuit with 13 children whose mothers' DNA was found
What if there was a killer out there whose job was to destroy other killers? Such a scenario is brought to the big screen
What is most needed to solve cases of missing and murdered women, and protect others from becoming victims, is information. Canada is long overdue in setting up a national DNA database for missing persons and unidentified human remains, she says. Canadian police forces need to better share information with the public that could help break cases and find missing women.
A permanent memorial for the victims of serial killer Robert Pickton is one step closer to reality. The carved cedar pole
The chair of the advisory committee on the safety and security of vulnerable women, former B.C. Lieutenant-Governer Steven
Waiting for the Canadian state to do something about violence is literally killing us, so I am not interested in participating in any delaying tactics or knowledge gathering for a state that clearly isn't listening. I want meaningful change and I want it now, and I don't think that's too much to ask for. Because my life and the lives of all women and girls are worth more than this.
2012-04-27-mediabitesreal.jpg Monday morning marked the long-awaited release of Wally T. Oppal's Missing Women Commission of Inquiry report. To say commissioning this report was a bit controversial is like saying Pickton himself was a bit murdery. Oppal's investigation basically entailed a jaunty stroll across a packed minefield of modern Canada's touchiest subjects including racism, sexism, classism, aboriginal politics, the sex trade, mental illness, alcoholism, drug abuse, bureaucratic cruelty and police incompetence, all headed by a party hack from an embattled provincial government that might very well poll worse than all the others put together.
UPDATE - Dec. 17: Commissioner Wally Oppal's 1,448-page report, released in December 2012, concluded public indifference