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romney

Although Canadians don't get a vote in Tuesday's presidential election, there's no shortage of Canucks offering opinions
2012-11-05-electionbannerreal.jpg It is deeply worrisome and disturbing to see the amount of hate that is out there against Muslims. Obama failed to stand up against the bigots who started spreading misinformation about his religious beliefs. He should have silenced them by asking them, "so what if I were a Muslim?"
The voting may be taking place south of the border, but that hasn't stopped Canadian newspapers and pundits from making endorsements
We asked a group of prominent Canadians what would be better for Canada: an Obama win or a Romney win. But we can't let the
Do Canadians care more about American politics than what's going on at home? As is custom, a group of Americans have threatened
2012-11-05-electionbannerreal.jpg Election campaigns have always been fodder for journalists and media watchers to lament the state of political coverage in today's media. Recent research, however, suggests this horse-race preoccupation is misguided.
2012-11-05-electionbannerreal.jpg Though image politics is still very much with us, we are entering a third age of democratic politics as a result of the 24-hour cable news cycle, social networking, YouTube, Twitter, mass apathy and at least in the American case, the archaic electoral college system. As a result of all this we get meta-politics, image politics taken to its absolute degree.
2012-11-05-electionbannerreal.jpg In a couple of days, the American populace will elect the next President. Numerous self-identified "progressive" voters have endorsed the Obama campaign, stating that while Barack Obama is certainly not perfect, he is far better than Mitt Romney. However, one of the major areas that have been largely ignored is Obama's foreign policy record in the Middle East.
As a younger woman, I stood beneath the arch on countless occasions at the height of the Cold War. It was a time when there were far fewer allied nations and as a Canadian teen I knew my closest allies were those I could reach through the arch to connect with. In 1984 the Americans were not just my neighbors, they were my family in every sense of the word. Suddenly, it's 28 years later. You find yourself in 2012 in the midst of the US election and you realize, with shock and awe that the gate is closing - not because of economics or war or terrorist threat or because a guard is standing at the border locking the gate in front of you - but in the name of blind adherence to ideology.
Can we engage voters -- especially young people already prone to apathy and boredom? In this age of infotainment and indifference, everyone is worried about what young people will do at the polls Tuesday. Or if, in fact, they'll show up at all -- even though it's easier than ever to become engaged.