HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

rural

The town's mayor was opposed because there’s no “straight Pride.”
Introducing a new blog series about the small-but-mighty communities across the country.
Services like surgery and obstetrics are being packed up and moved wholesale to urban centres, forcing rural patients to travel long distances to access care. You might think that urban hospitals are the winners in this equation. Unfortunately, this is not the case.
I am one of a large number of physicians who have been forced to choose between office work and certain types of hospital work because the latter is no longer close and accessible. The number of family physicians attending deliveries has been in decline for a long time, and accessibility is a key reason.
Menstruation is universal, it is a part of a woman's identity and is something all women have to go through every single month. What the advertising neglects us to see is the thousands of women out there who have to work under very harsh conditions while having their periods.
A long overdue conversation has begun in Canada about how to ensure large sections of our country are no longer cut off from an essential service which is taken for granted by so many others -- access to high-speed Internet. Not only are a large section of our fellow Canadians being cut off from vital services, they are also being prevented from fully participating in Canadian society and contributing the ideas and the innovations that make our country great. Rural Canada makes up 30 per cent of the country's population and produces one-third of our economic output. It is time to get Internet service in rural and northern Canada moving at full speed.
One of the things that people often overlook when comparing city life with country living is the water. I was trying to articulate this to an urban colleague a few days ago. Living in the country has its water advantages, but it also has water drawbacks.
The upcoming federal budget has the potential to be transformative and make lives better for rural Canada. Ottawa has committed to making significant investments in infrastructure, housing, and climate change prevention and to work with municipalities to improve quality of life for Canadians.
Last year, we exported almost $30 million in fresh-cut trees to the United States and another $32.6 million in trees to the rest of the world. When combining the $60+ million that Canadians spent on real trees last year, it all adds up to a $125 million contribution to our rural economy.
While some of us are using the new power of 3D printers to make smartphone cases and chocolate figurines, two engineering students from the University of Toronto are using them to print functional human skin.