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salmon

Watching grizzly bears catch and eat salmon as they swim upstream to spawn is an unforgettable experience. Many people love to view the wild drama. Some record it with photos or video. But a few want to kill the iconic animals -- not to eat, just to put their heads on a wall or coats on a floor.
Follow Us On Twitter Like Us On Facebook Sockeye salmon have begun their run in B.C. waters, drawing massive attention to
Would you like some salmon with those tires? No, really. B.C.-based tire chain Kal Tire has a rather unusual promotion right
When a tailings pond broke at the Mount Polley gold and copper mine in south-central B.C., spilling millions of cubic metres of waste into a salmon-bearing stream, B.C. Energy and Mines Minister Bill Bennett called it an "extremely rare" occurrence, the first in 40 years for mines operating here. He failed to mention the 46 "dangerous or unusual occurrences" that B.C's chief inspector of mines reported at tailings ponds in the province between 2000 and 2012, as well as breaches at non-operating mine sites.
In our view, these regulations allow the ministers to authorize a broad range of pollution with few limits or checks and balances. It is natural to fear that the federal government is preparing to abdicate its responsibilities to protect fish from pollution.
With March 24 marking the 25th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, this disaster provides a lens into considering the Enbridge Northern Gateway project and the risk it poses to wild salmon, one of our country's greatest natural assets.
Consumer demand for sustainable farmed seafood is growing, but the food supply for the salmon in the pens is running thin
Seriously: Is there anything more British Columbian than a video of salmon spawning in local waters? We don't think so. On
Areas of Earth that have remained relatively free of industrial development have taken on a special significance. In Canada, they include awe-inspiring landscapes like the Sacred Headwaters in northwestern B.C. But the Sacred Headwaters is not protected under law. It remains at risk from a multitude of proposed mines, railways, transmission lines and other projects that will eviscerate the landscape if approved.
The health of fish is undoubted. A great source of lean protein, omega fatty acids and low in fat. But the problem today is that our fish supply is contaminated with mercury and PCB's and the oceans are being overfished. The following fish have been put into three groups. Those to avoid, those that are good to consume and those that can be eaten on an infrequent basis.