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saving hope

People maybe should be talking about Canadian TV drama more. I know that's a strange opening statement given blogs are a-buzz over the CRTC's new rules and regulations overhauling television broadcasting. But quotas and points systems and funding is all well and good, but the main goal is getting shows on the air and eyeballs glued to those shows. And there are recent occurrences that warrant a bit of analysis.
Let's look at two Canadian medical dramas: the aforementioned Remedy and CTV's Saving Hope. Both are slick, set at a big city hospital, featuring some Canadian stars with an international profile, mixing soap opera-y threads with medical crises of the week.
In the last couple of years Canadian TV programmers have gone nuts for comedy -- specifically so-called "American-style" sitcoms. So far it hasn't really worked out too well with a lot of cancellations and even those series that continue often receiving mixed reviews. So maybe it should come as no surprise that one of the best comedies to come along on Canadian TV is out of left field -- APTN's Mohawk Girls!
The only time people aren't complaining about government regulation is when they are complaining about the lack of regulation! When Netflix speaks against regulations, they do so out of two motives. One, as a corporate entity that wants nothing to interfere with their profits. But secondly, as an American company.
Nobody wants to hear screaming in a hospital. It's never a good sign and sitting in "Saving Hope"'s Hope Zion Hospital cafeteria
Whenever assessing a TV show there's the question whether, above and beyond simple professionalism, it brings something new to the table. A fresh perspective. A revisionist idea. And every viewer has something different they prioritize: style, concept, characters. So what does Remedy bring to the TV medical drama?
Daniel Gillies has plenty of blood on his hands these days. On the Canadian medical drama “Saving Hope,” Gillies plays brilliant
A "crossover" is when characters from one series/property appear in an unrelated series/property. In comic books, the "shared universe" idea is so intrinsic, characters regularly guest star in each other's magazines. There are different reasons for doing a TV crossover. The first is just for the fun of it.
There was a time when you could declare a Canadian TV season if two series were airing around the same time. And a "hit" season if people had actually heard of one of them. And then along comes Played -- CTV's crime-drama about undercover cops that premieres Thursday, Oct. 3rd. Here's the best part: it's actually quite good.
TV Ontario's new medical drama, Hard Rock Medical, hasn't slipped under the public radar entirely. Still, I'm guessing a lot of potential viewers are unaware of it, and those aware of it probably cynically decided to give it a pass, sight unseen. Which is too bad, 'cause it's actually pretty good.