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scuba diving

"Futures uncertain and the end is always near." Jim Morrison On a sunny day in mid-July, when the air is warm and the water
I was shocked when I heard about the death of my friend Carlos Fonseca two weeks ago. He was in Ginnie Springs, Florida about to start exploring a cave system called The Devil's Spring. The following day rumours started to circulate on a couple of diving forums that Carlos had died while inside the system. How he died is not really known.
Zebra Mussel filter millions of gallons of water; it's how they feed. The result, the once soup-like Great Lakes are now crystal clear. That doesn't mean the water is unpolluted, far from it. Their output is crystal clear, which for divers is a definite plus. So you see, from a certain perspective, what started as a natural disaster has a definite upside. Now, I know some might argue that learning to love environmental disasters requires a very self-centered attitude. What I celebrate, others revile. I look forward to figuring out what new and clever angle I can come up with the next time we lay waste to some pristine wilderness area.
A few days ago my friend invited me to go diving with a group of disabled divers. He told me that one group member, Harry, is a quadriplegic who is one of the best divers he's ever trained. Harry can't use his legs. He has limited use of his arms. But he can control his buoyancy and trim, and with those two tools he rides the currents like a sea otter.
Is riding a reindeer across Siberia on your travel bucket list? How about visiting the last man living in the radioactive zone in Chernobyl? Canadian TV host and adventurer Scott Wilson (above) has done all these things and more on the television series, Departures.
The ride across the island to West Bay was like a scene out of "Romancing The Stone". We were surrounded by thick, lush jungle-esque vegetation with no other car in sight. Unlike Michael Douglas and Kathleen Turner, our road did not wash away and we were not chased by armed Colombians, or Hondurans, either. By the time we arrived at our charming bungalow near the beach, the sun had come out and stayed that way for the next ten days.