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Seasonal Affective Disorder

Older children and teens are most prone to the winter blues.
The next few months will be tough on a lot of people.
The season a woman gives birth in can have an effect on her mental health later on, findings show.
Winter weather makes most of us apprehensive about getting a cold or the flu, and often enough those fears are justified. No matter how religiously we wash our hands, keep our distance from others who already have the sniffles, or try to fortify our immune system with extra doses of vitamins, it seems to be a losing battle year after year. Yet some folks never appear to get affected. They just sail through this treacherous season without a hitch. How do these lucky few do it?
There's just no proof they help you.
Maybe it's a good time to book a vacation.
I stay on my fitness horse by reminding myself that movement is a privilege and that the future Me will ALWAYS be happier if I move. The understanding that exercise positively affects my mood has informed my entire fitness philosophy. In fact, improving my mood is typically the primary reason I train.
You're not alone.
It's critical that we start thinking about the effects of our long and dark winters on us now, so that we can take the steps needed to ward off the very real mental health challenges that can arise as part and parcel of Seasonal Affective Disorder.
About 15 per cent of Canadians get the "winter blues."