HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

seed

Good things don't always come in big packages — this is especially true for seeds. Although individually seeds are one of
The only time people aren't complaining about government regulation is when they are complaining about the lack of regulation! When Netflix speaks against regulations, they do so out of two motives. One, as a corporate entity that wants nothing to interfere with their profits. But secondly, as an American company.
Ewww ... sperm banks. Not exactly the place you want to brag to your friends and family about visiting. But, in the sitcom
The new tsunami hitting shores are Canadian sitcoms bragging they are just like Hollywood comedies. This has always been a problem in Canadian entertainment -- a deliberate lack of respect for what has come before, or an ignorance of it entirely. And this new push to be more like American shows has lead to a breed of Canadian sitcoms that are the worst of both worlds, like a mermaid with a fish head and human legs.
CTV's new sitcom Satisfaction didn't cross any lines. I suspect most people watching it -- male or female -- didn't think about any possible undercurrents. That's kind of my point. Just because we accept it as the norm, doesn't mean it's not worth asking why we accept it as the norm.
I'd written before about the sitcom, Seed -- one of the few contemporary Canadian-made sitcoms. My past comments related to my usual pet peeve: Canadian identity. Seed tries to imply it's American.
There are so many Canadians living in Los Angeles that Hollywood is cheekily referred to as the fourth largest Canadian city. Yet Canadians are almost never depicted in American movies and TV shows. Except when they are.
Canadian TV, like Canadian society, has long oscillated between American standards...and European mores. There seems to be this weird eagerness to promote the myth that Canadian TV (and by inference, Canada) is bland and conservative in comparison to American TV.
Part of the strength of it is the fact that it seems un-selfconscious and unapologetic about its Canadian setting. It isn't like the writers are struggling to cram in some awkward Canadianism just to say they could...but because they're trying to be true to these characters and their world.
I like to blog about pop culture -- specifically (though not exclusively) Canadian film & TV. Ideally, I should write about