self-help

Your exercise choice will evolve in tandem with your fitness level, but the principles that get you moving are constant!
We aren't particularly good as adults at looking back at the things we do that make us proud, or remind us that we are good, smart and professional.
Too many of us let "brain propaganda" highjack our lives. You know what I am talking about: "Who cares if I hit the snooze button and miss my workout just this once?" Or, "I can eat this cake - what does it matter?" Or, "Why even try to lose weight... I am just going to fail. I can't do anything right."
I am currently renewing my fascial stretching certification from the Stretch To Win Institute. (Fascia is sheets of connective webbing that encases and connects the entire body; it unites bones and muscles.) I do partner fascial stretching with clients, but attending the course reminded me how wonderful the motions feel in my own body. I am now re-motivated to prioritize fascial stretching after every run.
In the next years, omnipresent digital content and wearable devices could be game changers for the self-help industry. AR powered devices have the potential to help us break bad habits and adopt good ones in the same way our mothers taught us as children.
The self as we know it is a Western construct - a white invention. Self-help, self-love and ascribing value to the self couldn't be more white, because it all amps up to the idea that people have quantifiable values and that value is directly related to meaning.
What I am saying is, when you make a choice that your future self will not be proud of, lean into the fall and learn from every choice -- both positive and negative. Work to understand your personal triggers and coping mechanisms so that you evolve into the healthier and fitter future self you want to be.
To lose weight, help lower blood pressure, improve energy or decrease anxiety, you need to change your preferences - your daily habits - so that more often than not you are making healthy choices. You need to be consistently healthier. It sounds obvious, but consistency falls into the life category of "simple, but not easy."
Standing for hours on end -- as a professional chef, bartender, butcher, home economist or cheese monger -- is hard on the body. Standing, lifting, bending, and twisting for hours on end, often with less-than-ideal posture, frequently results in achy legs and feet, a sore back, and stiff almost arthritic-feeling hands.
The stories we tell ourselves are the most powerful stories of all since the constant soundtrack running through our heads provides lots of reinforcement. In order for us to live our most fulfilled, happiest lives, it's important to make sure that the stories we tell ourselves are helpful. Here