HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

sharia law

In the wake of the Orlando Massecre, we are hearing so many confusing statements and stories from our Canadian politicians
Muslims can learn from mother. They must be proactive in the fight against Islamist movements that lead to terrorism. Because self-distancing alone cannot fight terror. On the contrary, merely denying personal responsibility for an act tends to lead very quickly to the abrogation of the responsibility to act.
Just as the greatest target of groups like ISIS and the Taliban comprise of fellow Muslims who are deemed apostates, the brunt of exclusivist ideologies is directed to fellow Muslims. Religious ideologues would like to proselytize and create enough mass following to achieve their political goals.
In the 25 years I have called Canada home, I have seen a steady rise of Muslim women being strangled in the pernicious black tent that is passed off to naïve and guilt-ridden white, mainstream Canadians as an essential Islamic practice. The niqab and burka have nothing to do with Islam. They're the political flags of the Muslim Brotherhood, ISIS, the Taliban, al-Qaida and Saudi Arabia. Now I learn I have not only to fight the medieval, theocratic adherents of my faith for a safe space for myself, I have to battle the Federal Court of Canada as well.
Chantal St-Onge said she thought she was endorsing an anti-austerity protest and did not look carefully at who was hosting it.
The movement to ban foreign and/or religious law, according to the New York Times, is the brainchild of an Islamophobic lawyer, David Yerushalmi, who has been described by the Anti-Defamation League as having a record of "anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant and anti-black bigotry.
This ethic came under attack in the 20th century when Frans Boaz and Bertrand Russell introduced moral and cultural relativism. Boaz wrote there were no inferior or superior cultures, that all were equal and couldn't be ordered in an evolutionary scale. Russell believed the survival of democracy required tolerance and understanding of others.
I have written about Quebec before. Let's just say that I won't be beatified any time soon. But I think the Québecois deserve
There has been a lot of debate about the nature of Egypt's changing political landscape in the past few days -- did a coup remove President Mohamed Morsi or was the military acting on behalf of a massive popular uprising? But one thing almost everyone agrees on is how quickly the 85-year-old Muslim Brotherhood and Morsi lost favour with the people.
Fatemeh Derakhshandeh Tosarvanda is in danger of being sent back to Iran from Canada, where she could be stoned to death