Six Pixels of Separation

What makes a piece of content a television show, a movie, a YouTube clip? It's not a new discourse. It's something that many
If you think that creativity will be safe from the automation of everything, you are wrong. It's not a question of "if" creativity
It turns out that nobody knows what's what when it comes to the media anymore. Who do you trust for your news and media? Now
The San Francisco based startup Secret (that was founded by two former Google and Square employees) is getting tons of attention, followers and fans. In short, you can write anything that's on your mind, add photos or colors to the background and customize this content while being able to share it, free of judgment, and without attaching any of your personal information or profile to it.
When last year's Consumer Electronics Show (CES) rolled into Las Vegas, many were surprised and intrigued by Amazon's presence. They didn't have a typical booth on the trade show floor. Instead, they set up a Kindle vending machine inside the Las Vegas airport (near the ATM and soda pop).
Whether we like it or not, the great discourse and online conversations are being clouded and polluted with spammy comments. If you have ever blogged, you will note how difficult it can sometimes be to sort the wheat from the chaff.
Contrary to popular marketing ideology, we do not live in a multiple-screen world. My world is about one screen: whatever screen is in front of me. Too many brands continue to build digital ghettos where the Web, mobile, social and even e-commerce occupy and have their own, unique, strategies. This leads to brands that are wildly different across their platforms. To put it simply? These strategies are stupid. Here's why.
While the philosophy of why we work continues to evolve and modernize, it still feels like we hold on to the dogma of what business is supposed to be. Perhaps with all of this moral awakening, sharing on social media, connecting to others and events like Occupy Wall Street or the Arab Spring, we should be paying closer attention to the human bottom line rather than the financial one?
Before you start lighting up those pitchforks and come after us marketers with a mix of mass hysteria and moral panic, take a look at your own online behavior and ask yourself, which scenario you prefer? Go to Amazon and start shopping (presuming you have been there before), and ask yourself, "what is the experience like?"
Thurston and others who have recently talked about their inability to keep up with the influx of digital inputs could be missing the bigger point: this is the inevitable outcome of success. All of this isn't technology's fault. All of this is our fault, because we're allowing the technology to manage us, instead of the other way around.