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skills

The goals of Canada's New Infrastructure Plan are not just to grow our infrastructure, but at the same time to harness new and emerging technologies to make it cleaner, greener and smarter. For the government's hallmark policy to date -- the Innovation Agenda -- we hear the consistent message that we need to support the people that innovate.
To cope with technology's impact, those in the skilled trades are adopting models of life-long learning that merge the technical, the technological and the mechanical; the toolbox of today is brimming with technology and so too are the classrooms in which apprentices train.
Weak growth necessitates that we use all of Canada's assets to reignite our economy. Yet, data are assets that have yet to be effectively leveraged. While we fixate on the numbers of startups or high growth firms, do we really have adequate data with which to build a resilient labour force or an innovative economy?
What can be done to tackle the employment obstacles facing Canada's youth? Plenty. Too often, government reports and media accounts wax poetic over our fine universities as a source for solutions to our youth employment challenges. Our equally impressive polytechnics get lost in the discussion.
Skills and innovation -- core elements of the college/institute mandate -- have emerged as absolutely fundamental to the government's agenda. They have been the focus of several consultations and more than a few reports, including a recent series of recommendations by the finance minister's Advisory Council on Economic Growth.
Increasing communication skills to improve collaboration can assist an organization to become more effective as well as successful. When your employees and leaders are getting along with each other, there are fewer misunderstandings, so, workplace frustration also becomes reduced.
While many of us are fortunate enough to take education for granted, not everyone can get the education they need. I believe that technological and pedagogical innovation can help break down barriers and make learning more accessible, engaging and inspiring.
The costs of war are borne by all, from those on the front lines to the spouses, families and communities who serve on the home front. As such, it is critical that we focus not only on the short-term investment that a mission requires, but the life-cycle costs and resources requisite for any mission.
What Canada needs is efficient access to the best and brightest from abroad to help technology industries transform and grow here in Canada and to add value to an economy that is languishing while transitioning from resources to innovation.
Our labour market is not evolving to help companies compete globally. Modernizing our labour market requires two things: a talent pool equipped with the appropriate skill sets, and an up-to-date approach on collecting and sharing labour market data.