HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

skin cancer

While other preventable cancers are decreasing, skin cancer rates are going up.
Experts don't know why the gender discrepancy is so big, but they suspect men are less likely to take precautions.
Here's what you can do to prevent it...
The recent awareness campaign #MelanomaHeroes speaks to me on an even more personal level, as it afforded me the opportunity to publicly thank the two most important people in my life: my twin daughters. Claire and Cass, my right-and-left-hand women. My heroes, melanoma and otherwise.
I am a survivor of advanced melanoma: skin cancer which spread to my lymphatic system. I was able to receive eight powerful - and expensive - immunotherapy treatments which quite possibly saved my life. It never occurred to me that, should the disease come back, that I might not receive further treatment.
I am consoled by having the ability to share my story in the hopes that it can help others. Whether or not a fellow melanoma warrior speaks openly about their own diagnosis, I can give my perspective, and my new-found optimism, to those who may feel as isolated as I did when I found out I have stage 3b skin cancer.
The sun. It's a beautiful thing, and when it's shining, the streets, parks and beaches get really busy. The city comes alive! But it's not all good. The sun can burn! And, a history of sunburns increases the risk of skin cancer, including melanomas. Sun exposure can also cause wrinkles, dry skin and age spots.
My life was forever changed in one diagnosis: cancer. After 25 years, I had finally learned that the rash on my body was the precursor to a rare form of cancer called for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma (CTCL) that would need to be treated with full-body radiation. My treatment plan was as unique as my diagnosis.
My daughter saved my life. In the doctor's office for her sore throat, she urged me to have our physician look at my mole. The mole I had had on my hip all my life, the mole that had changed colour and shape over the course of six months, the mole that I would quickly learn had mutated into stage 3b melanoma.