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social services

Is health care the highest-return place for provincial governments to invest? Our analysis suggests the answer is "no."
Her idea of a "tangible shift" in the wake of #MeToo only supports wealthy, white, educated, straight, cisgender and able-bodied women.
We should increasingly ask how much time and stress is expended by caregivers negotiating with medical and social care systems.
When health care is positioned as a key way of managing social problems, we put enormous strain on the system. This forces us to be duct-tape doctors, trying our best to seal up the gaps in a patchwork system of inadequacies and shortfalls. Primary care in particular is perfectly situated to absorb the costs of poor social supports.
We, the disability family, have been an afterthought -- for governments, service agencies and organizations -- for far too long. Our opinions have been sidelined, our emotions trivialized, our needs prescribed and our resources shuttered.
I can't truly explain how exhausting, challenging and incredibly cold this night was. I had been given a real-life scenario of a homeless youth as a part of 360°kids' 360°Experience. Our experience had us stepping into the shoes of a 16-year-old male, who was unsafe at home and had to leave quickly to save himself.
With recurring outbreak of conflict or violence in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, focusing on implementing essential services may seem like a secondary concern. Conversely, the low-quality services may be the root of the problem. Poor state performance is exacerbating tensions in society, deepening mistrust and discouraging citizens from engaging with the state. Public institutions that deliver essential social services are not responsive to citizens' needs, leaving citizens to abandon the system and seek alternative means.
Mayor Ted Clugston of Medicine Hat, Alberta has become the reluctant spokesperson for a controversial approach to reducing homelessness. Reluctant because just a few years ago, he opposed the initiative. Sometime in 2015, Medicine Hat will become the first municipality in Canada to eradicate homelessness.
It is also interesting to note that 43 per cent of CEOs, who can afford to pay for their retirement without other contributions, have set up defined benefits pension plans that will provide them $1.9 million every year from the time they turn 65. Less than 11 per cent of the general population has a defined benefits pension plan, in stark contrast with a full 43 per cent of the wealthiest in our society. But the Couillard government is doing absolutely nothing to improve the lot of the 89 per cent who are excluded.
All levels of government and the private sector must begin to see the tremendous social and economic benefits of doing the right thing. Canada can end homelessness and our elected officials have a duty to work together on funding community based solutions.