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soldiers

The Liberal government was going to allow the abeyance on the Equitas lawsuit -- the court case in which the government has been arguing the "moral obligation" they have to soldiers maimed in war -- to run out. The biggest piece of the Liberal party platform and mandate letter was the reestablishment of life-long pension, and now they are going to court to argue against it.
Four stories of life, death, and service in the Canadian Forces.
We need a system that reduces the number of hoops the limbless have to jump through, and a system that understands that if your friend dies in your arms there may be days that are difficult.
Just as the Conservative government committed, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau should commit to passing the Victims Rights in the Military Justice System Act as soon as Parliament resumes. There is no reason not to do so. Equality before the law is good, common-sense policy, and supporting our troops is always the right thing to do morally and politically.
"You no smuggle!" said the customs agent. It was nine-year-old Bev Miller's first trip to continental Europe. Bev landed
About one-sixth of Canadian Forces soldiers discharged from the military due to medical reasons are released before qualifying
The wait times are for access to a special operational stress and trauma treatment program at seven locations across the
Veterans Affairs Minister Julian Fantino's behaviour towards a group of veterans last week disgusted me. And, when he blamed his behaviour on the actions of a union I became outraged. The union may very well have told the veterans a one-sided story about how their poor members are being hard done-by. That doesn't excuse the minister's behaviour. As a free public service for cabinet ministers and others in leadership roles, I'm going to offer up some completely unsolicited advice, right here, right now, at no charge. When a veteran is angry with you for being late, you say, "I'm sorry."
When I began to research Private John Bernard Croak I realized just how remarkable a man he was. Aside from the one award-winning day, all other aspects of this man's service record indicate a very poor soldier with a very serious drinking problem and issues obeying commands. That is why I want to tell you about him.
Just months ago, the Minister for Veterans Affairs stood in a Legion in London, Ontario and promised members that soldiers would no longer be cut loose. Clearly, that practice continues. I am calling upon the government to stop giving weak excuses and apologise to these Canadian heroes who have been dismissed because of the Conservative government's efforts to balance the budget.