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st. james park

The cost to repair St. James Park, the site of the five-week long Occupy Toronto encampment, could reach as high as $60,000
After its initial success, it's time for Occupy to think big. It won't be easy. Everyone thinks their cause is the most important. But the attempt to build this unity would have to be couched in language that encourages open dialogue and willingness to focus on root causes and not just symptoms.
The Occupy Movement seems to rise in popularity and attendance not when they decide to do something but rather when an external force lashes out at them. Once the threat passes, numbers dwindle down again. The support for Occupy is entirely reactionary. Is this any true way to incite global change?
More protesters began arriving just before noon. A police officer put the number at 1,200, but to me it seemed more like 400. The tents had already begun folding like houses of cards, mostly at the hands of city workers.
Turning St. James Park into an Alamo for its cause risked Occupy Toronto's ability to carry on after defeat. The potential power Occupy Toronto has isn't in clinging to an arbitrarily chosen plot of land. It is in the ability to harness the power of those who came out and to build a movement that has an impact on the world.
The midnight deadline has come and gone but Occupy Toronto protesters are still at St. James Park, preparing to stay overnight
Like many of the other occupy movements across Canada, Toronto is also being ordered out. In a decision delivered on Monday
Lawyers representing both sides of a dispute between the City of Toronto and Occupy Toronto protesters presented their cases
The first day they set up shop, the protesters' rights were the strongest they could be. But with each passing day, the case for Mayor Ford stepping in and "reasonably limiting" those rights has grown stronger. The question for the court to answer is whether the protests have already crossed the line, or whether the line still lies far off in the distance.
As the economist Jeffrey Sachs said in his visit to Toronto on Monday, the Occupy movement is part of "a third progressive era... likely... in the making." Will the church be a catalyst, or an inhibitor? Will we stand with the poor, the meek, and mourning? Will we love our neighbour?