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Stephen Harper China

Prime Minister Stephen Harper has wrapped up a one-day visit to Hangzhou, in eastern China, where he talked trade everywhere
Prime Minister Stephen Harper will skip the leaders' meetings at the upcoming APEC summit, choosing instead to attend Remembrance
Prime Minister Stephen Harper is making a trip to New York this week, but it isn't to attend a United Nations meeting to which Canada was extended an invitation. The Prime Minister will instead be in the glitzy hotel, where he is due to receive an award from the little-known Appeal of Conscience Foundation, an interfaith partnership of corporate and religious leaders. Between the successive fossil awards for environmental savagery and the unfortunate de-funding of reproductive health in foreign aid, the Harper government continues to slide Canada's international influence down to the gutter.
It may well be that Canadian influence on Chinese political and legal affairs will be strengthened by Canada's economic partnership with China and that private discussions can achieve more than public condemnations. If that is indeed the case, the Canadian government should be proactive in starting these conversations.
How YouTube-adorable are those pandas we are going to be hosting? Apparently panda fur is not soft and fluffy, but tough and bristly like a shoe brush (or so someone once told me who'd actually pet a panda). Which is also a good way of describing Stephen Harper's trip to China. It was similar to that of a jilted girlfriend driving past her ex with a new beau. It seemed to have worked -- at least upon some American lawmakers critical of Obama's recent decision to kill the Keystone XL pipeline. While the Canadian leader was courting his Chinese suitors, our American leader was joining our new team in Quebec for the much-anticipated launch of Le Huffington Post on Wednesday.
On the eve of Prime Minister Stephen Harper's last day in China, the prime minister of the Tibetan government-in-exile has
There's nothing that the Chinese government likes more than Western leaders dropping all that human rights stuff and instead coming around to kowtow before them, as Steven Harper will do with President Hu Jintao this week. And what has brought about this change? In a word: Oil.
When Stephen Harper visits Chinese President Hu Jintao next month, he can rightfully argue that he is now fully engaged helping Beijing get the pipeline it's been after for quite some time, and that he's deploying his best bully-boy tactics to get it.
As the West's elite plunges deeper and deeper into Sinophilia, with all other manner of lavish junkets to the wealthy Communist nation, criticizing the Chinese dictatorship (or even using inflammatory language like "Chinese dictatorship") has become the new signifier of simple-minded provincialism.