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Stephen Harper media

Stephen Harper lost the election not because Canadians rejected Conservative values, i.e., an aversion to big government, bureaucracy and regulation but because he came to be seen against democracy. Conservatives believe in smaller government, lower taxes and keeping the state out of the lives and businesses of citizens. But Mr. Harper sometime during his nine-plus years as prime minister began sacrificing our democratic institutions, especially the media, on the altar of his Conservative government.
"This is odd. There's a prime minister taking questions in the National Press Theatre with a journalist chairing."
At the start of his campaign, NDP Leader Tom Mulcair took some heat for declining to answer questions from reporters at his
The strategy seemed to have worked for them last time.
"I think you're all very aware of how we've structured our press conferences."
And he didn't even make the cover of Costco Connection, the 'lifestyle magazine for Costco members'
Whether we're talking bloody tales of yore featuring the Hatfields vs. the McCoys or contemporary Twitter nastiness between Nicki Minaj and Stephen Tyler, acrimony can be amazingly fun to watch. But these fights are only as interesting as the players are genuinely passionate, which is perhaps why the ongoing feud between the Harper Conservatives and the media has got to be one of the dullest prolonged quarrels ever. The assaults being launched and the injuries being claimed in this vendetta are just too weak and inconsequential for anyone not living in the Parliament Hill bubble to give a hoot about.
OTTAWA - Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his Conservative caucus members are back at work in Ottawa and spoiling, it seems
2012-04-27-mediabitesreal.jpg Is Stephen Harper's government legitimate? Welcome to the question that's preoccupied the folks running the media outlets. Said folks, who live disproportionately around the St. Lawrence, are supposedly trapped in a "Laurentian Consensus" of closed-minded self-righteousness.