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street food

It's worth the mouthful to order, or better yet, make.
Whether you love it or you love to hate it, there's no denying that America's mouth-watering street food hits the spot every time. From the chip trucks that line the beachfront in California, all the way to the city centre stalls of New York, the United States has quite an array of food that you can choose from.
You couldn't imagine eating some of these.
And you will NEVER guess where curry is most popular.
Calgary's creative food entrepreneurs have taken to trucks like a bento to a burrito, or naan to a taco. If you don't see the connection, read on. Whatever feeds your fancy, one thing is certain -- pound the pavement in Calgary and you're sure to turn up some satisfying street food.
When I announced my trip to Tel Aviv, Israel more than a few people told me the food would be a highlight. And they weren't kidding. The bread, the veggies and hummus are all so good I found myself asking, "Why are we eating what is comparatively garbage in North America?"
What separated Montreal from the other cities on our tour was that we did not have an actual food event to tap into -- instead we decided that Montreal was going to be the city that I did an old school popup at -- just build it and pray to the food gods that someone will hopefully come.
When I was told to that Detroit was on the agenda for cities being featured on Season 2 of Rebel Without A Kitchen I wasn't entirely sure how I felt about it. But being in Detroit, eating in Detroit and being a part of Detroit's vibrant up-and-coming street-food and art scene actually paints a very different picture of the city.
My travel companion was my two year old Atticus (a man of few words) who surprised me by declaring enthusiastically: "Mexicooooo" as he looked out the window in wonder. No, we weren't headed to some coastal gated community or beachside all-inclusive. We had touched down in central Mexico.
Montreal's recently self-identified foodies will finally get to enjoy the opportunity to stand in line for twenty minutes to pay $9 for a pork belly sandwich, thus catching up with the rest of Western civilization in realizing the ineffable and irreplaceable gastronomic qualities of "something that was in truck at some point."