HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

subsidies

Corporations denounce increased government spending. Except, of course, when government largesse flows their way.
Not only are these subsidies utterly useless from an economic point of view, they are destructive to the environment.
The U.S. Department of Commerce announced a tariff of more than 200 per cent on Bombardier's C-Series regional jet.
When governments try to actively create growth by supporting certain projects rather than others, or by investing public funds instead of letting companies invest and innovate, they can have the opposite effect. This is the wrong way to do things.
Before using the threat of equalization payments as a "poke in the ribs" to provinces such as British Columbia and Quebec, perhaps the petroleum industry should rethink its own dependency on subsidies. It should be aware that it, too, is vulnerable to budgetary policy.
An ugly thread of misspent taxpayer dollars, environmental destruction and conflict-of-interest -- backed by a government beholden to the mining industry -- runs along the recently completed Northwest Transmission Line, charges acclaimed explorer and scholar Wade Davis.
Keeping wild animals trapped in cages and killing them by gassing or anal electrocution is inherently inhumane, and the toxic runoff from fur farms and the chemicals used to treat fur are extraordinarily harmful to the environment. This is why Humane Society International/Canada and thousands of Canadians are calling for a federal ban on fur farming.
There's no doubt that electric cars are hot. From the beginning of 2012 to the beginning of 2014, the number of them on the road around the world quadrupled from 100,000 to 400,000. When you look at the numbers, though, it turns out that subsidizing electric cars is an extremely inefficient way of curbing GHGs. In other words, it costs a lot to reduce a little.
Tales of government waste make for excellent news headlines. Bev Oda's infamous $16 orange juice probably got more media attention than the $45 billion F35 procurement debacle. Part of the reason is that people understand the value and cost of orange juice. Rather than focusing on waste, analysts and the media should instead focus on getting more value for money from governments. We need to pay less attention to tens of dollars and more attention to billions.
Corporate welfare is the ultimate evasion of responsibility. It helps companies avoid the consequences that consumers would otherwise assign to them, the evasion demonstrated rather clearly by Chrysler's two government bailouts in a generation.