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sugar

Experts explain why your body might be wanting those treats.
Sweetened drinks may have harmful effects on blood glucose levels.
We can no longer pretend the berries make it healthy.
We can't cure heart disease or diabetes. But we can help prevent or delay them and other chronic illnesses in one vital way -- with a healthier diet. Easier said than done, of course. Most of us consume far too much sugar, saturated fats and salt, largely through highly processed foods. Often without even knowing it.
When picking ingredients to make a meal or choosing snacks, most people aren't aware of a "sugar cutoff" they should be looking for. What can be even more confusing is how much sugar is found in seemingly healthy snack foods such as energy bars.
No parent dreams of their child working at a young age, missing out on school. But for Mark and his family of seven children in the Philippines, one income wasn't enough to provide for their basic needs. At seven years old, his son Paul carried the burden of work to give his other siblings a better chance in life.
It's worth it.
A few nights ago, a swanky hotel in Toronto hosted a Chocolate Chip Cookie Battle. I would be stupid not to go. All the cookies sampled varied in their level of decadence. None of them disappointed. Each of the cookie connoisseurs told me that the recipe used to make their classic chocolate chip cookie was one that they had been using for over a decade. At this point, their recipes no longer needed tweaking, because to them they had the technique and ingredients down, therefore creating the perfect recipe. But I needed to know their secrets. So I asked.
Sugar isn't just about adding sweetness to your baked goods; it carries a different behaviour depending on what you're baking and what the sugar is being combined with.