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swine flu

The novel coronavirus appears to be more contagious than previous outbreaks.
We've blamed flu deaths on socioeconomic factors and pre-existing conditions. New research suggests our fate could lie hidden deep within the infected cell.
2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg Over the last few weeks, as expected, there has been a transition in the media headlines from the antics of Ford to the augury of flu. There was more than enough reason to believe that the virus that caused the pandemic from 2009-2010, better known as H1N1pdm or "swine flu" was back.
Influenza can be a weapon of mass destruction. The latest candidate worth worrying about is H7N9. It jumped from birds to humans earlier this year. Of the 137 people known to have been infected, 45 died. There's no evidence that H7N9 spreads among humans. On the other hand, it wouldn't surprise any of the experts if H7N9 learns how to jump from person to person and mutates into a fast-moving mass murderer.
2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpgMuch like any new offering from Stephen King, which requires time to determine its place in his legacy, the new H7N9 flu requires more than just a few weeks to determine its place in the historical records of infectious disease.
2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg Hollywood is not the only place with an increasing their number of sequels. While returning health villains, like West Nile Virus and "Swine Flu 2" continue to represent only a minority of worldwide infections, the future is looking rather glum. There are certain to be more germs that will re-emerge and send us all into a frenzy worthy of a blockbuster's opening day weekend.
Although federal health officials are warning people susceptible to flu to stay away from pigs, the risk of Islanders contracting
Health officials are warning the public to keep a distance from pigs, after reports that more than 200 people in the U.S
A new strain of the swine flu virus called A(H3N2) may now be spreading through person-to-person contact, the Public Health