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syrian civil war

Aya Abou Rshd studies at home in Ottawa with a borrowed school laptop.
Vanessa Beeley has been called “the Syria conflict’s goddess of propaganda.”
The shelter in Aleppo seems plucked out of a fairy tale. Mohammad and his siblings stepped through the welcoming green door and walked into a safe place for the first time in months. They were surrounded by a tiny garden filled with Jasmine flowers and olive trees and a big house filled with children laughing and playing.
In March 2014, Mustafa heard three bombs near his home in Sheran located in the province of Aleppo, Syria. At that precise moment, he knew his biggest fear was real: ISIS was at their door. This was his tipping point; his family packed a few belongings and tried fleeing to Turkey.
The seven-year-old gained international attention for her tweets from the besieged Syrian city.
Many were tweeting videos amid the destruction.
Bana Alabed was tweeting as Syrian troops captured former rebel-held areas of Aleppo.
Almost all of the children who study at this school have fled violence in northern rural Hama over a year ago, and sought refuge in caves and tents that are spread along this rural area. Last year, some of the children living in rural Idleb had an opportunity to catch up on the education they have missed.
Driving towards Madaya in a convoy that snaked along the Damascus highway for hundreds of metres, a huge knot formed in the pit of my stomach. Not knowing what we would find there, and remembering the harrowing images of emaciated children pleading with their eyes for some respite from this siege, it was hard not to be worried.
Picture calling your child aside for a private conversation. Look into their eyes, and take a big breath. Now imagine asking your child to leave. Not for a few days, and not to visit Grandma. Ask your son or daughter to walk until they find food or work. Just keep walking, even if it takes days, weeks or months.